Prevalence of CRC Screening Remains Low in Those Aged 50 to 54

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(HealthDay News) — From 2000 to 2018, there was an increase in the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening, but it remained low for adults aged 50 to 54 years, according to a study published online June 23 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Po-Hong Liu, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues estimated the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in adults ages 50 to 75 years using data from the National Health Interview Survey from 2000 to 2018. In addition, increases in prevalence of screening were examined in five-year age groups from 2000 to 2018.

The researchers found that the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening increased overall from 36.7 to 66.1 percent from 2000 to 2018. In 2018, prevalence was lowest for those aged 50 to 54 years, Hispanics, Asians, those with less than a high school degree, those from low-income families, and those without insurance (47.6, 56.5, 57.1, 53.6, 56.6, and 39.7 percent, respectively).


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Over time, the increases in prevalence differed by five-year age group: for example, from 2000 to 2018, there was a 19.4 percent increase (28.2 to 47.6 percent) seen for those aged 50 to 54 and a 31.6 percent increase (46.4 to 78.0 percent) for those aged 70 to 75 years.

“Considering the various demands placed on people in their late 40s, from caregiving responsibilities to increased workloads, they may have even more barriers to getting screened,” a coauthor said in a statement.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the biotechnology industry.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)



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